A Civil War ATW guide

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Lord Ashram
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A Civil War ATW guide

Postby Lord Ashram » Wed Aug 22, 2007 6:14 pm

Just wanted to get this back up here for those who are playing ATW... can give you some hints about the best uses for each state of troops!


In the American Civil War era of American Total War, there are only two factions: the Union and the Confederacy. Each faction has its strengths. Union regiments are often well trained at discharging precise volleys and can hold firm under pressure. Confederate units are known for the unshakeable morale and the ferocity of their charge.

Regiments in the American Civil War era are generally designated in one of two ways. First, there are regiments from different states; generally well trained, these units can be counted on to perform on the battlefield, some being more distinguished than others at specific battlefield tasks. Second are the ?named? regiments, regiments of fame and renown during the American Civil War. Generally these units are elite companies of men, hardened through combat and simply better soldiers than the vast majority of their countrymen. However, even these elite troops often have a role at which they excel above all others!

First are the units of the North. The Union, lead by President Abraham Lincoln, was undoubtedly the master of industry and had the benefit of an ocean of possible recruits. Over two million men served in the Union armies during the Civil War. Generally more well supplied than their Confederate counterparts, Union infantry often marched to war looking a bit more uniform under blue jackets and in light blue pants. Weapons were generally more standard issue (the ?Springfield? musket and Enfield musket being the most popular) and plenty of uniform munitions allowed Union soldiers to train to a high degree. While the Union regiments were generally not known for the intense pride that many Southern regiments boasted, they were solid soldiers available in huge numbers and able to stand when called to arms.

Vermont Infantry: The state of Vermont contributed a great many soldiers to the Union cause. In fact, the Vermont Brigade suffered the highest casualties of any Federal brigade; in a week at the Wilderness and Spotsylvania, the regiment lost 1,645 men out of a total of 2,800. Vermont units could be found in every theatre of the war and could be counted on to perform most roles admirably.

New Jersey Infantry: New Jersey troops were always well supplied and highly trained. Many units served the duration, including the 3rd New Jersey, which fought its first battle at First Bull Run and last served at the surrender at Appomattox. New Jersey units can be depended on to deliver hellish volleys and to stand fast even under the most furious of charges.

Maine Infantry: Involved across the all fronts of the war, the men of Maine won perhaps their most famous acclaim at the battle of Gettysburg, where they held the far left flank of the Union line. Maine men, lead by a large group of educated officers, could move and respond quickly and could be counted on to hold the line under even the most intense pressure.

New Hampshire Infantry: Seeing their first action early on at First Bull Run, New Hampshire regiments nonetheless retired in good order on that first hellish day. New Hampshire men fought in every major engagement from the inception of the Army of the Potomac until it mustered out in December 1865, often being at the front of a charge into Confederate lines.

Berdan?s Sharpshooters: The 1st and 2nd U.S. Sharpshooters took their nickname from their founder, Hiram Berdan, a champion marksman. Clad all in green and able to melt into their surroundings, each member had to place ten consecutive shots within five inches at a range of 200 yards. Eventually armed with the Sharps rifle, the men of the Sharpshooters were terrifyingly effective; it has been calculated that they killed more Confederates than any other regiment in the army. In one remarkable show of period marksmanship, in the course of the Peninsular campaign a small group of Sharpshooters silenced a Confederate battery for over an hour by shooting the gunners down at a range of over half a mile!

Ellsworths Zouaves: Otherwise known as the 11th New York Volunteers, or the New York Fire Zouaves (many men had come from the ranks of the New York City firefighters,) this Zouave unit?s Colonel was shot dead before the unit even saw combat by a Confederate sympathizer. However his influence did not stop there, as this formidable unit helped start the Zouave trend in the American armies.

Duryees Zouaves: Wearing the fez and bright red pants of French background, the 5th New York is one of the most recognizable regiments in the war. Duryees Zouaves (named after their founder) had a reputation for standing fast and for coolness under fire, going so far as to count off and reform its ranks while under hellish Confederate fire at Gaines? Mill. The 5th New York would go on to build up a decorated record of service through the war.

Pennsylvania Bucktails: Also known as the 1st Pennsylvania Rifles, this regiment, comprised of experienced hunters and marksmen, moves fast and fights hard. Fighting at Anteitam, Fredricksburg, Gettysburg, and a host of other major conflicts through the war, these Pennsylvania men decorated their kepis with buck tails in a reputed effort to ?dress up? the otherwise boring standard blue kepi.

The Iron Brigade: Originally comprised of a mix of Wisconsin and Indiana regiments, the Iron Brigade became one of the most famous units to serve in the war. Famous for their blue frock coats and black ?Hardee? style hats, at Gettysburg this tough-as-nails regiment was one of the first units to arrive to the field and held fast, eventually losing 1,200 out of the 1,800 men engaged in that battle. It pleased many Union officers when the Iron Brigade came to the defence of their lines.

The Irish Brigade: Another of the most famous regiments to serve in the American Civil War. Comprised largely of Irish and Scottish immigrants from the 63rd, 69th, and 88th New York originally, the Irish Brigade was well known for being ferocious in close combat and unwavering in holding the line. The regiment won particular renown at Fredericksburg and Antietam, charging resolutely under the fluttering green-field-and-golden-harp flag.

Now the units of the South. The Confederate States of America fielded armies marked by excellent generals and excellent morale. While often short on materials and even on replacement troops, hard-charging Confederate troops were often led to victory over larger and better supplied Union enemies by charismatic, genius, and often slightly mad commanders! The CSA seemed to be destined for victory earlier in the war, until the mass production of Northern industry and the unending supply of replacement soldiers wore the brave Southern states down.

VMI (Virginia Military Institute) Cadets: This institute for young cadets sent their men into the field at the battle of Newmarket. While not possessing the same ferocious skills as hardened CSA infantry, the VMI Cadets were still able to deliver volleys of practiced (albeit untested) fire in support of their southern brethren.

Alabama Infantry: Alabama infantry formed the core of many fine regiments in the armies of the Confederate States of America. Often wearing coarse clothing of grey or even butternut coloring, Alabama boys could be counted on to fulfill any battlefield role they were asked to play.

Georgia Infantry: Georgian infantry wore perhaps the widest array of uniforms of the Southern states, including butternuts, greens, blues, and neat grays. Enraged by General Sherman?s ?March to the Sea,? Georgian infantry developed a reputation for charging home as if whipped into a frenzy. Georgians were also very proud and valiant, in fact continuing to fight even after Lee?s surrender at Appomattox Courthouse; the 5th Georgia finally laid down its arms on April 26th, some 2 weeks after the surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia.

North Carolina Infantry: The ?Tarheel? state, with the ability to produce its own textiles and with plenty of ports for those ships who could slip by the Union blockades, contributed a large number of men to the cause of the Confederacy. Well supplied, these men could carry the fight to the enemy with the bayonet as well as defend tooth and nail.

Mississippi Infantry: Mississippi, deep in the heart of the South, had much riding on the outcome of the Civil War. Understandably, the men of Mississippi developed a reputation of holding the line until the end, including at Antietam, where they held the Confederate line near the Dunker Church even after all of their field officers were killed.

Texas Infantry: The men from Texas, a rough and tumble border state that was actually an independent republic, gained much fame on the Civil War battlefields. Proud and unyielding, Texans were often at the front of successful Confederate charges, being counted on to drive the blue bellies from the field.

Louisiana Tiger Zouaves: ?Wheat?s Tigers? were a fancy-dressed Zouave unit made up of many Irish ?toughs? from the streets of New Orleans and were only held together by the commanders sheer will at times. Like their commander, who after being shot through both lungs declared ?I don?t feel like dying yet,? (and didn?t!) the Louisiana Zouaves were at their fiercest in close quarters.

The Maryland Guard Zouaves: Wearing a flashy Zouave uniform, the likes of which were generally more popular in the Federal armies, the Maryland Guard Zouaves served in battles including First Bull Run and Gettysburg. Capable musketmen and steady in combat, the Guard were a dependable unit on the field.

Hood?s Texas Brigade: Like all Texans, Hood?s Texas Brigade, made up of men from Texas units under the command of General John Bell Hood, could be counted on for fierce and determined charges. Hood?s Texans became the shock troops of the Army of Northern Virginia, famous for their fearless attacks and bloody work across many battlefields.

The Stonewall Brigade: Originally under the command of General Jackson, the Virginian units that made up the Stonewall Brigade became famous for their steadfast courage and remained an elite force in the Confederacy. They got their name when, despite a hail of Federal fire, General Jackson stood fast before his men, standing as one man noted ?as a stone wall.? These men could always be counted on to stand firm despite assault by fire and steel.

Both sides make use of a wide array of artillery as well as brigades of cavalry. However, rather than the heroic charges of the Napoleonic Era, Civil War cavalry fought from foot, dismounting and using their repeating rifles and carbines (including the deadly Spencer carbine) to create a form of highly mobile and dangerous firebase. The Civil War cavalry commander has at his disposal a fast, versatile force that, if used properly, can make a very immediate impact on battle.

Of course, all of these men would be useless without proper command. To that end each faction can call upon some of their most famous Generals to command their troops. The South can follow the genius and slightly mad General Jackson, the dashing and charming cavalry General J.E.B Stuart, the dependable defender General Longstreet, or the father of the Confederate Army, General Robert E. Lee. The Union forces are under the command of the ever cautious General McClelland, the prototypical soldier General Hanthingy, the rumpled and fiery General Sherman, and of course the future President General Ulysses S. Grant.
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Postby Lord Markedman » Wed Aug 22, 2007 7:23 pm

thanks this will be very usefull in making armys
will make them as historical as possible instead of spaming elites
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Postby Lord Ashram » Wed Aug 22, 2007 8:08 pm

I think the civil war mod is slightly susceptible to spammed elites. However, careful use of the state troops can be a very powerful weapon! But yeah, I tried to make the info interesting and still include just the faint hint of what, gameplaywise, they are good at. Most of the units have their best uses; there aren't many all arounders.
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Jakob
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Postby Jakob » Wed Aug 22, 2007 8:44 pm

And where is the Arkansas infantry? :evil:

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Postby Field Marshal Blücher » Mon Aug 27, 2007 9:46 pm

Jakob wrote:And where is the Arkansas infantry? :evil:


Sorry, Jakob, my District of Columbia infantry wiped them ou . . . wait a second! Where are my boys??!!
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Postby Wildfowler » Tue Feb 12, 2008 9:23 am

Thanks for the info, very interseting and well set out. This is of great value to myself. To my shame I have little knowledge of the American Civil War (The English Civil War is my expertise, but then i am a limey!!).
In fact it prompted me to get a book from our local libaray on ACW.
Thanks again.
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crazy canuck
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Postby crazy canuck » Thu May 08, 2008 9:36 am

Don't forget the 40,000 Canadians that fought too !

They didn't have their own brigades or regiments, but we were there helping out Abe Lincoln and US Grant !

29 of them won the Medal of Honor, and 4 were promoted the the rank of general in the Union Army.

:lol: :lol: :lol:
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Postby Lord Ashram » Wed Aug 27, 2008 5:07 am

Btw, I JUST noticed this; General Hanthingy? Seriously?
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Lord BloodnGore
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Re: A Civil War ATW guide

Postby Lord BloodnGore » Sat Mar 21, 2009 7:35 pm

Yep and no "Benavides Regiment." After the hasty retreat of the bulk of the Confederate forces from the lower Rio Grande Valley, the only sizable Rebel force remaining to defend the area around Laredo, Texas was commanded by Colonel Santos Benavides. Lone Star State. "Tejanos" (As the Mexican Americans from Texas are called) had been among the first to take up arms for the Confederacy and were among the last to surrender.

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Re:

Postby Lord Crow » Sun Mar 22, 2009 1:50 pm

I would rather have a russet coated Captain who knows what he fights for and loves what he knows, than he who calls himself a gentleman and is but little else

Oliver Cromwell

Wildflower, I take it you are a round head? It makes me want to take up arms and fight you on the battlefield, LOL

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Lord Markedman
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Re: A Civil War ATW guide

Postby Lord Markedman » Wed Mar 25, 2009 12:43 am

aghh this for the king and england that we fight him!!!!! 8)
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